Friday, 24 August 2018

St Mary's Church Wilby


 The "treasure" at this church as featured in the book would be very difficult to find without the book's directions.

"Set in the north wall, near the north-west buttress of the tower and about seven feet above the ground, is a flint which has been split to reveal its core, exposing the outline of a birds head"

A fossil, thousands and thousands of years old has been set among the stones of the tower. I found it, it's been cleaned up since the photo in the book was taken. Very curious


 The first thing to notice as you step into the church is the remains of this wall painting of Saint Christopher, crossing a river full of fish.


 The font has lots of C15 carvings but no elaborate font cover this time. Although the Suffolk Churches website has a picture of the font with a cover.

 The pulpit is elaborately carved and dates from C17..........even a roof! Maybe to stop bat or bird droppings falling on the preacher?
Stained glass over the alter
 And remnants of much older stained glass at the top of some of the side windows
A carved and inlaid panel made to commemorate the Millenium
Wonder what's in this chest, looks very old but why is it here in the main part of the church.
According to the Suffolk Churches Website  the bench ends are some of the best carvings in the county, I think this is C19  carving rather than medieval which are mainly damaged. I read all about
William Dowsing HERE , he was the man given the job of clearing Suffolk churches of imagery during the 1640's.

A well kept church in the centre of this small village

Back Tomorrow
Sue

 
 

30 comments:

  1. I'm really enjoying your church visits, Sue, thank you.

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  2. These churches you visit are absolutely fascinating. The amount of history in each church is amazing. Does anyone know the age of that bird fossel? And I wonder what the significance of it is to the church? The ancient chest you show also raises many questions. It all makes me want to travel back in time to see the church in the past.

    I see you have your book on churches back now. I imagine it is quite helpful on these visits. Thank you Sue for making it possible for me to see these places I would otherwise never see!

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    1. The book is the reason for the visits, it travelled to Surrey by mistake but safely back now

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  3. Well I’m glad I do not have to polish in that church, all that fiddly carving. Sarah D.

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  4. Church chests were used to store important documents and church valuables and where they survive are usually located in the church itself. They commonly had at least two strap locks with a key held by two separate people.

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  5. Fascinating look at an interesting church, the wall painting is fading as so many do. As for keys, one of the keys for the safe at our church has disappeared, and a lot of grumbling goes on.

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  6. Pleased you have your book back Sue. Interesting to see the church,
    Hazel c uk

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  7. I think before Oliver Cromwell, churches must have been so pretty inside. Him and Henry VIII have a lot to answer for.

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    1. I think there would have been colour and paintings everywhere. Yes blame those two men

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  8. Quite a large church for a village and some curiosities in there. Perhaps an old vicar resides in the chest - or maybe the font cover is kept in there!
    I have never seen a pulpit with a roof - makes it look a bit like a shower cubicle!

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  9. I would imagine the chest is the old equivalent of the modern safe that keeps all the legal and important documents.
    AT Hatfield Heath Church there's a little chest that has three locks so three people had to be there to open it - the vicar, the warden and - er - someone else, I forget who. Quite a safeguard, I would think.

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  10. Is the church at Ramsholt in your book it is hard to find but has the most wonderful views over the river and an oval tower.

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    1. Yes it is there, long way from home but I hope to get there sometime

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  11. We are not getting out much at the moment so I am enjoying your visits to the churches.

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  12. this is very interesting .. ive done some family history and my mums maiden name is wilby and we've traced them back to WALPOLE ? Is there a church there on your list?

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    1. Walpole is one of the 600 Suffolk churches not in this book I'm afraid

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  13. The covered pulpit reminds me of the one in York Minster only the St Mary's carvings are more elaborate. Also, from what I've read, the use of the roof over a pulpit was meant to improve the acoustics of the preacher because it acts as a sounding board.

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    1. Acoustics sounds more sensible than protection from birds!

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  14. Beautiful old church Sue - lovely idea to 'collect' churches at this time in your life.

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    1. It's certainly getting me out round the county

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  15. Such a joy to see some of the old churches that I would never be able to see.

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  16. ditto the above comment. Thank you for visiting and documenting these old churches, so nice for older folks who can't get around so well and ex pats, (both of which apply to me)!

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  17. If the preacher kept jawing on until the bats pooped on him, I'd say he deserved it - wouldn't you! I do love the old churches - New Zealand doesn't have any going back more than about 150 years. Most were built in wood, which rotted, burnt, or was fiddled with. Thank you for showing us these beautiful old treasures.

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  18. I think this is my favourite church so far! Beautiful! X x X

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  19. I am late to this post, but had to comment, it is a wonderful church and I enjoyed your tour of it!

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