Friday, 16 November 2018

A Children's Book Plus Other Books Read.

I know someone must have mentioned this on a blog otherwise I wouldn't have ordered a children's book from the library but it was the perfect  book to read over Remembrance weekend. Hilary Mckay is an award winning children's author and wrote this new book to commemorate the centenary of the ending of the Great War

The Skylarks' War

I would have to say this is for older children as it takes the families in the story through schooldays, the horrors of the Great War and onto marriage.

The story starts in 1902 when  baby Clary is born, sadly her mother dies just a while later, she has an older brother Peter  and they grow up in a house with their very remote father. He doesn't like children at all, and has nothing to do with them. Clary always believes it is her fault that her mother died and her Father doesn't care for them.
Each Summer they are sent to Cornwall to stay with their paternal grandparents and their older cousin Rupert who lives with the grandparents when he isn't at boarding school ( his parents having gone off to India without him years before).
Luckily both Clary and Peter are intelligent and manage to work their way through schools until it's time for Peter to be sent off to boarding school with Rupert.
While Clary works hard to try and get to University, some of their friends are out in France fighting and when one vanishes many things change at home.

The other books I've read this month are all crime fiction

Anne Perry- Triple Jeopardy. Historical Crime Fiction. This second book in a series featuring Daniel Pitt, a young lawyer. (the son of Thomas Pitt about whom Anne Perry previously wrote a long series of crime novels) These books are set in the Edwardian era, as the country looms towards the Great War. A Brilliant story well written as always.

Marsali Taylor  - Death in Shetland Waters. Crime Fiction A new to me author which I went for because of the title - being set in Shetland like Ann Cleeves books. I didn't realise this was the 6th in a series but it was a really good story. The action all revolves round the crew of a Tall Ship sailing from Norway to Dublin with trainees on board and a stowaway. Really enjoyed this, it had me reading even more quickly than normal.

Chris Nickson -  The Hanging Psalm. Historical Crime Fiction. This author has written several different crime series set in different periods of history. This is first of a new series. In Leeds of 1820 thief-taker Simon Westow is hired to find a kidnapped daughter but the real answers to this crime come from his own past. Fast paced story showing the darker side of Leeds.

I was really looking forward to reading The Salt Path but as it starts with a diagnoses of terminal illness I was a bit put off. I will get back to it.

Library van due next week and  I've still got several un-read, but there might not be many to collect so that's OK

Back Tomorrow
Sue.







20 comments:

  1. I know what you mean about not reading the book with the terminal illness. I had cancer two years ago and still struggle when books have cancer mentioned in them - terminal or otherwise. I struggled to read anything other than chick lit for ages but I'm slowly getting back to 'proper' reading! The Skylarks war sounds quite heavy for children, I would agree it sounds more for older children. x

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    1. I was surprised at the adult themes in this book - there was also a young lad in love with an older boy. I thought perhaps children are more grown up than I thought!

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  2. It sounds a very thought provoking read for older children - something to season the more conventional diet of teen-fiction, I guess.
    xx

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  3. The book sounds very good. I think it will get harder for children to understand about the wars as relatives that experienced it first hand will soon not be with us to tell their stories. My mum is the last of our family now that can tell us tales of being in Sheffield during the blitz, sheltering in the basement of some local flats in Hillsborough and then being firstly evacuated and then joining the land army and although I can remember a lot of her stories often the detail is missing.
    DH's dad has a lot written in his memoires for our children and their children to read.
    Incidentally when my mum and I were out and about in Derbyshire one day we got chatting to a man in Ashford in the Water and he sheltered in the same flats in Hillsborough during the war that were opposite where mum lived (he was a bit younger than mum and actually lived in them at the time) but he could remember the long nights down in the basement and knew the house my mum lived in.

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    1. All my family were in Suffolk during both wars and despite all the airbases I think it was quietish. My Grandma had a table shelter indoors and my mum could remember sleeping underneath it

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  4. An interesting collection as always.

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    1. I brought home a lot of books in October so not getting on with them very well - less than a week to library van day again

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  5. Since I had my stroke I cannot read or write like I use to. I have tried the audio books but did not really like them. I use to say I was never alone with a book. Fortunately I can do a lot of other things to keep me occupied.
    Hazel c uk

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    1. My neighbough where we lived before listen to audio books all the time - even out gardening and walking the dog - I always thought it was sad that she missed the birds singing!

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  6. Don't give up on The Salt Path, he works, and walks, through his illness with very little mention of it. He's still alive today, so no sudden shocks to deal with while you are reading it. Xx

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    1. I think it was knowing that he was still alive after the diagnoses that felt hard ( that sounds selfish I know)

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    2. It may “sound” selfish but it’s very honest and human.
      Perhaps it's a book to read next year rather than this.
      In reply to your earlier comment to me about “They Left Us Everything”, my copy is in the Charity Shop Box” so if you could get your address to me and trust me with it I'll gladly send it to you instead.
      I will understand if you'd rather not do that and won't be offended.
      Sue

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  7. I have put myself on the waiting list at the libray for The Skylarks War and will have to wait as it’s a recent publication but like the sound of it very much. I miss reading fiction for older children as that was one of my self set tasks at school (I made an exception for Harry Potter as they failed to interest me at all). I read many well written books suitable for P6 and 7 in my quest to introduce pupils to a variety of authors and writing styles.

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    1. I keep thinking I ought to read Harry Potter but don't really want to!

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    2. Harry Potter books are brilliant. I'm sure you'd enjoy them.

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  8. Very understandable re the Salt Path. The night my dear brother in law died we had to race to the hospital, racing being hard to do as we had to take two ferries, two hours each. The stress of sitting doing nothing but watch the clock and wondering if he would be alive when we got there was awful. The next time I was on the ferry I stayed on the deck because I couldn't bear to be inside. It was the culmination of a horrible year of things going wrong in the family. A year on from it I still avoid sad books and films. On a more cheerful note I love reading books for older children, even younger ones. The plots are usually excellent.

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    1. I really do want to read the Salt Path as everyone says it's a good story. Maybe I'll take it back and then reorder or just grit my teeth and read it

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  9. Sounds like a lovely book Sue.

    God bless.

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